Healthy Relationship News – May 2016

DIBBLE NEWS

SECOND WEDNESDAY WEBINAR - May 11th, 2016

Putting Youth Relationship Education on the Child Welfare Agenda: Findings from Research and Evaluation

FUNDING STREAMS

News Letter Section Break

DIBBLE NEWS

Love Notes Instructor's Manual Cover v2.1

Love Notes made THE LIST!

Love Notes Shown Effective In Preventing Teen Pregnancy

The Dibble Institute is thrilled to announce that its relationship skills program, Love Notes, has been added to list of teen pregnancy prevention Evidence Based Programs (EBP) maintained by the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. Love Notes was included based on statistically significant decreases in sexual activity, increases in contraceptive use, and avoidance of pregnancy.

“We are pleased that we now have proof that relationship skills education is an effective strategy to prevent teen pregnancy”, Kay Reed, Executive Director of The Dibble Institute noted. “It’s great to have a new approach that works, especially with high-risk youth between the ages of 14 and 19.”

Love Notes, a comprehensive healthy relationship education curriculum, teaches young people how to build healthy romantic relationships as well as how to preventing dating violence and avoid unprotected sex. Love Notes was evaluated in CHAMPS (Creating Healthy Adolescents through Meaningful Prevention Services), a 5-year $4.8 million study through the Kent School of Social Work, University of Louisville. Anita Barbee, Ph.D. was the Principal Investigator.

The study consisted of a cluster-randomized trial involving over 1,400 youth. Stringent data analyses examined data from 933 at-risk, low-income youth including urban, foster, refugee, and immigrant participants who were recruited from 23 community-based organizations.

The study found that six months after the instruction, adolescent participants were significantly less likely than youth in the control group to report ever having had sex, ever having been pregnant, having had sex in the last three months, and having had sex with out a condom or without birth control in the last three months. At one year, participants were less likely, by a significant measure to have not become pregnant. (Control = 6.4% vs. Love Notes 3.5%).

Dr. Barbee commented, “After decades of studying relationships, I thought teaching pregnancy prevention skills in the context of learning how to form and maintain healthy romantic relationships could really make a difference. I’m gratified to say that my hunch was correct.”

She went on to say, “We chose to study Love Notes to see how the intervention would work with disenfranchised youth searching for meaningful connections such as those from oppressed minorities living in poverty, those living in foster care, and those who are refugees from war torn countries. It worked well with all those populations.”

The EBP review findings were recently updated to cover research released from July 2014 to August 2015. As part of this update, the review team identified and assessed evidence for 16 new programs. Seven of these 16 programs met the review criteria for evidence of effectiveness, showing evidence of a favorable, statistically significant program impact on at least one sexual risk behavior or reproductive health outcome of interest to increase the list of Evidence Based Programs to 44. Love Notes, which shows impact on three outcomes, is only one of six programs on the list to show efficacy in preventing pregnancy.

sub-section

Love Notes Instructor's Manual Cover v2.1

RQplusCover-v3.0

Live Trainings in Two Evidenced-Based Programs

Join us in Columbus, OH for a cost-effective, hands-on training in our most popular curricula. Love Notes and Relationship Smarts PLUS were created to help teens and young adults learn, often for the first time, how to make wise choices about relationships, dating, partners, sex, and more.

News Letter Section Break

SECOND WEDNESDAY WEBINAR

May 11, 2016

Second Wednesday Webinars

Putting Youth Relationship Education on the Child Welfare Agenda: Findings from Research and Evaluation

Relationships are important in helping youth achieve their goals and a successful transition into adulthood. Having the skills to manage healthy relationships can make a difference as youth make decisions related to school, employment, and pregnancy prevention. These skills may be especially important for youth involved in or aging out of the child welfare system.

This webinar will provide participants with a better understanding of the importance of healthy relationships for youth in foster care.  This webinar also will summarize current research and evaluation evidence on relationship education for youth in foster care.

At the end of this webinar, participants will learn:
  • Why healthy relationships matter for youth in foster care
  • What types of programs focus on healthy relationships for youth in foster care
  • Key program elements that are critical for successfully improving relationship skills among vulnerable youth

Presenter: Mindy E. Scott, Ph.D., Deputy Program Area Director and Senior Research Scientist; April Wilson, Ph.D., Research Scientist with Child Trends

Who should attend: Youth-serving program staff and administrators in the fields of child welfare, healthy relationships, pregnancy prevention, youth development; researchers working on issues related to adolescents, policy makers, funders, grant managers and writers.

When: Wednesday, May 11, 4:00 pm Eastern/1:00 pm Pacific

Duration: 60 minutes

Cost: Free!

Register Now!

News Letter Section Break

FUNDING STREAMS

Grants.gov Logo

CDC Funding for Teen Dating and Youth Violence Prevention

The purpose of this funding announcement is to support local health departments with high-levels of capacity and readiness to prevent teen dating violence and youth violence to expand existing prevention efforts to address shared risk and protective factors. The due date to apply is June 6, 2016.

(Ed Note: Research on Dibble programs clearly shows the link between building romantic relationship skills and decreases in violence, both verbal and physical.).

sub-section

Support for At-Risk Youth Programs in Oregon and Washington

Telligen Community Initiative

Telligen Community Initiative

The mission of the Telligen Community Initiative (TCI) is to support innovative and forward looking health-related projects aimed at improving health, social well-being, and educational attainment. Grants are provided to nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, and government agencies serving communities in Iowa, Illinois, and Oklahoma. TCI's funding priorities include the following: Health Innovation, Health for the Underserved, and Healthcare Workforce Development. The deadline for applicants in Iowa is February 17, 2016; the deadline for Oklahoma applicants is May 11, 2016; and the Illinois application deadline is September 7, 2016.

Visit the TCI website to learn more about the funding priorities and application procedure.

sub-section

Silver Family Foundation

Support for At-Risk Youth Programs in Oregon and Washington

Silver Family Foundation

The Silver Family Foundation supports nonprofit organizations in Oregon and Washington that work with at-risk youth. The Foundation's Transitional Youth Development Grant Program provides grants to organizations that offer in-depth, long-term investments and opportunities for motivated, low-income youth. Priority is given to organizations that work in the areas of mentorship, high school completion, college and post-secondary preparation, and experiential education. Letters of inquiry may be submitted throughout the year; invited proposals are due March 31 and September 30, annually. Visit the Foundation’s website to review the grant guidelines.

sub-section

Four TeensDibble goes Digital You asked. We delivered.

Our most popular TEACHING TOOLS are now online.

The Dibble Institute’s content-rich teaching tools for building healthy relationships just got easier to use. Take a look!

Explore Dibble Digital

sub-section