What makes a good life?

What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it’s fame and money, you’re not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you’re mistaken. . . Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction. In this talk, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life…
See the lecture here.

Mind Matters

Young people who have experienced trauma and toxic stress often have difficulty regulating their emotional responses when facing challenges in school, life, and relationships. As students learn the skills and strategies in Mind Matters, they can begin to say, “I am not a victim of what happened to me.”

Love Notes – EBP Model

You now have a new tool in your tool kit! An innovative approach to teen pregnancy prevention that appeals to older youth.
Love Notes was included in the federal Office of Adolescent Health’s Evidence Based Program list based on statistically significant decreases in sexual activity, increases in contraceptive use, and avoidance of pregnancy.

UL

Announcement

of Request for Proposal

The Dibble Institute is pleased to announce a competitive cooperative agreement opportunity to conduct an initial evaluation of Mind Matters – Overcoming Adversity and Building ResilienceMORE>>

Harvard

Less Sleep Associated

with Risky Behavior in Teens

The amount a teenager sleeps is associated with how likely they are to engage in risky and suicidal behavior, a new study said. “Fewer hours of sleep on an average school night [is] associated with increased odds of all selected unsafe behaviors,” … MORE>>


2nd Wednesday Webinar

SECOND WEDNESDAY WEBINAR

December 2018

Our Gift to You! Enjoy the holidays and watch one or even two of our archived videos that might be of interest to you!

You can find the archived videos here

Education Week

Teen Brain:

How Schools Can Help Students Manage Emotions and Make Better Decisions

Adolescence tends to be seen by parents—and many teachers—with dread. Teenagers are likelier to engage in risky behaviors and disengage from school. But emerging cognitive and neuroscience research suggests … MORE>>