Healthy Relationship News – April 2019

DIBBLE IN THE NEWS

THE LATEST

NEWS YOU CAN USE

TOOLS YOU CAN USE

SECOND WEDNESDAY WEBINAR – April 10, 2019

Tips for Teaching

Relationship Education in High Schools:

Lessons from the Field

FUNDING STREAMS

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DIBBLE IN THE NEWS
Dept of Juvenile Justice Florida

Florida Department of Juvenile Justice has added both Love Notes and Relationship Smarts PLUS to their Sourcebook of Delinquency Interventions. This means they are now eligible to be funded by the state.

(Ed. Note: Please let us know if you would like to review copies of these proven programs.)

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Guide Star Platinum2019

The Dibble Institute earned a 2019 GuideStar Platinum Seal of Transparency by sharing our key metrics and highlighting the difference we are making. Check out our updated GuideStar profile: https://www.guidestar.org/Profile/8053783.

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THE LATEST
Arizona State University

Adolescents’ Daily Romantic Experiences and Negative Mood

Romantic relationships, although increasingly normative during adolescence, also present unique developmental challenges that can portend psychological difficulties. Underlying these difficulties may be the degree to which daily romantic transactions potentiate fluctuations in negative mood. The present study examined associations between adolescents’ daily romantic relationship experiences and their same-day negative affective states.

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University of Maryland

The Economics of Non-Marital Childbearing and The “Marriage Premium for Children”

A large literature exists on the impact of family structure on children’s outcomes, typically focusing on average effects. We build on this with an economic framework that has heterogeneous predictions regarding the potential benefit for children of married parents. We propose that the gains to marriage from a child’s perspective depend on a mother’s own level of resources, the additional net resources that her partner would bring, and the outcome-specific returns to resources. Data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics are consistent with the heterogeneous predictions of this framework. In terms of high school completion or avoiding poverty at age 25, the “marriage premium for children” is highest for children of mothers with high school degrees and mothers in their early/mid-20s. For the more advanced outcomes of college completion or high income at age 25, the marriage premium is monotonically increasing with observed maternal age and education.

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Family Studies Blog

Less Stable, Less Important: Cohabiting Families’ Perspectives Across the Globe

A growing number of children in developed countries today are being raised by parents who are living together but not married. Some argue that cohabiting parents provide a family environment that is comparable to a married household, given that the children are being raised by two adults. However, a new survey of 11 developed countries shows that large shares of cohabiting couples with children under age 18 doubt that their current relationship will last, especially in comparison to married parents. Moreover, cohabiting parents in most countries are less likely than married parents to see their relationship as a vital part of their life.

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NEWS YOU CAN USE
Children's Institute

Social Determinants of Health and Child Outcomes

Home and family environments, community and neighborhood conditions, and socioeconomic status—the social conditions that impact how people live, grow, learn, play, work, and age—shape health risks and outcomes and can predict quality of life in later years. These social conditions are known as the social determinants of health (SDOH), and they can significantly affect how a child grows and develops.”

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University of California

Child Development Services Should Include Fathers and a Parental Relationship Focus

A holistic approach, replacing fragmented interventions, should support couple partnerships and how both parents relate to their children.

In the past 20 years, research has clearly identified two major determinants of early child development that social scientists previously ignored and that practitioners and policy makers have only begun to incorporate into public service delivery. The first determinant is a key asset to children – their fathers. And here we mean fathers who are positively involved with their children. The second is an environment that is also vital for child development:  the quality of the relationship between their “careers”, who are usually their parents.

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Pew Research Center

The Way U.S. Teens Spend Their Time is Changing, but Differences Between Boys and Girls Persist

Teens today are spending their time differently than they did a decade ago. They’re devoting more time to sleep and homework, and less time to paid work and socializing. But what has not changed are the differences between teen boys and girls in time spent on leisure, grooming, homework, housework and errands, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

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TOOLS YOU CAN USE
Harvard Logo

How Children and Adults Can Build Core Capabilities for Life

Every day we take on the ordinary, sometimes challenging, tasks of work, school, parenting, relationships, and just managing our busy lives. How do we navigate these tasks successfully? And what can send us off course? Science offers an explanation. This 5-minute video explores the development and use of core capabilities — known as executive function and self-regulation skills — from early childhood into adolescence and adulthood.

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Johns Hopkins University

Adolescent Development Explained

The HHS Office of Adolescent Health partnered with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health to provide important information about how teens develop, think, and act. The guide also includes tips for adults on how to use this information to support youth. If parents and caring adults have a better understanding of the challenges and opportunities that adolescents face, they can help provide guidance and encouragement for the young people in their lives.

Additional information on adolescent social development can be found inThe Teen Years Explained: A Guide to Healthy Adolescent Development – PDF, produced by the Center for Adolescent Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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SECOND WEDNESDAY WEBINAR

April 10

Second Wednesday Webinars

Tips for Teaching

Relationship Education

in High Schools:

Lessons from the Field

More than Conquerors, Inc. (MTCI) is nonprofit social service provider in Conyers, Georgia, with a long history of delivering relationship education to high school students. With funding from the Office of Family Assistance at the Administration for Children and Families, MTCI is currently partnering with staff from Mathematica Policy Research and Public Strategies to deliver and evaluate the Relationship Smarts PLUS curriculum in two Atlanta-area high schools.

In this webinar, Phillippia and Brian will discuss emerging lessons from the evaluation and MTCI’s long history of serving youth. The lessons include MTCI’s process for hiring, training, and supporting facilitators to achieve optimal student engagement and impact. They will also include general tips for selecting a curriculum, engaging youth, and making the content relevant for students.

Objectives: Specifically, webinar attendees will learn:

  1. The steps and characteristics prioritized when hiring facilitators.
  2. How to select the right curriculum for your population.
  3. How to engage youth in relationship education.

Presenters: Phillippia Faust, Director of Programs, More Than Conquerors, Inc., Conyers, GA.

Brian Goesling, Ph.D., Senior researcher at Mathematica Policy Research.

Who should attend: Healthy marriage/relationship grantees, staff, and evaluators; teen pregnancy and dating violence prevention practitioners; health educators; high school guidance counselors; Family and Consumer Sciences students and educators; and anyone with an interest in youth and relationship education.

When: Wednesday, April 10, 2019, 4:00 pm Eastern/1:00 pm Pacific Time

Duration: 60 minutes

Cost: Free!

Register Now!

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FUNDING STREAMS

GRANT FORECASTS

(Editor’s Note: Dibble programs are currently used by a large number of grantees using the following three funding streams. If you would like a complimentary 30 day online review a copy of one of our programs as you make your plans, please let us know!)

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Department of Health and Human Services

Title V Competitive Sexual Risk Avoidance Education (CSRAE)

(Only organizations in Alaska, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Kansas, Maine, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, Wyoming, American Samoa, District of Columbia, Guam, Marshall Islands, Northern Mariana Islands, Palau, and Virgin Island are eligible to apply.)

The purpose of the CSRAE is to fund projects to implement sexual risk avoidance education that teaches participants how to voluntarily refrain from non-marital sexual activity. The goals of CSRAE are to empower participants to make healthy decisions, and provide tools and resources to prevent pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and youth engagement in other risky behaviors. (Estimated posting date: February 22, 2019)

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Mental Health Grants in Metropolitan NY and Philadelphia.
Department of Health and Human Services

Sexual Risk Avoidance Education Program

The purpose of the SRAE Program is to fund projects to implement sexual risk avoidance education that teaches participants how to voluntarily refrain from non-marital sexual activity. The services are targeted to participants that reside in areas with high rates of teen births and/or are at greatest risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The goals of SRAE are to empower participants to make healthy decisions, and provide tools and resources to prevent pregnancy, STIs, and youth engagement in other risky behaviors. (Estimated posting date: March 4, 2019)

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Funds for Health Initiatives in the Upper Midwest

Medica Foundation

Medica Foundation

The Medica Foundation, an affiliate of Medica Health Plans, provides competitive grants to nonprofit organizations and government agencies within the company’s service area in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, and western Wisconsin. The Foundation offers funding for Early Childhood Health. They support programs that focus on promoting healthy families to foster optimal growth and development of young children. The application deadline is May 10, 2019. Visit the Foundation’s website to learn more about the guidelines and application process for each funding area.

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Health and Youth Development Initiatives in Tennessee Supported

Blue Cross Blue Shield

BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee Community Trust

The BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee Community Trust supports nonprofit organizations, state colleges and universities, and government agencies in the communities served by the company throughout Tennessee. Areas of interest include charitable clinics; organizations dedicated to the prevention, early detection, and curing of disease; and community-based programs for youth health and development. Organizations promoting diversity and inclusion are also considered. The application deadlines are May 1 and November 1, annually. Visit the BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee’s website to learn more about the Community Trust’s application process.

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Grants Enhance the Health and Well-Being of Montanans

Montana Healthcare Foundation

Montana Healthcare Foundation

The Montana Healthcare Foundation is dedicated to improving the health and well-being of all Montanans. The Foundation’s 2019 Call for Proposals will provide grants to organizations that focus on one of the following areas: Behavioral Health, American Indian Health, and Partnerships for Better Health. The Foundation is offering grants ranging between $10,000 and $50,000 for projects implemented within a 12-month period and grants up to $100,000 for projects implemented within a 24-month period. Montana-based nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, and government agencies are eligible to apply. The application deadline is May 30, 2019. Visit the Foundation’s website to review the 2019 Call for Proposals.

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Department of Justice

OVW Fiscal Year 2019 STOP Formula Grant Program Solicitation

Funds are now available for states and territories to support communities, including American Indian Tribes and Alaska Native villages, in their efforts to develop and strengthen effective responses to sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. Only the designated state office may apply. Apply by: May 8th.

(Ed. Note: Up to 5% of this funding may be used for prevention education. Relationship skills training is noted by the CDC as an effective preventative intervention.)

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