Healthy Relationship News – December 2018

DIBBLE NEWS

  • Dibble Announces RFP to Study Mind Matters
  • UGA Evaluation of Relationship Smarts PLUS

THE LATEST

  • Why Are Young People Having Less Sex?
  • NCFR 2018 Margaret Arcus Award Winners

NEWS YOU CAN USE

  • Reduced Screen Time for Well-Being
  • Video: Adolescent Brain Development

TOOLS YOU CAN USE

  • Love Rules: How to Find a Real Relationships in a Digital World
  • Tips for Teaching Healthy Relationship Ed. in Schools

SECOND WEDNESDAY WEBINAR – December 2018

Happy Holidays!

CLICK HERE to enjoy one of our archived webinars

FUNDING STREAMS

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DIBBLE NEWS
Mind Matters

Announcement of Request for Proposal

The Dibble Institute is pleased to announce a competitive cooperative agreement opportunity to conduct an initial evaluation of Mind Matters – Overcoming Adversity and Building Resilience.

We will fund up to $15,000 for an 18-month (from award to final report) evaluative study to understand what participants learn, what changes they have seen in their lives, and what the instructors have observed over the course of the instruction. Example outcomes include, but are not limited to: emotional regulation, anxiety, interpersonal skills, and physical health. An experimental or quasi-experimental design with control or comparison group is encouraged, but not required.

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University ofGeorgia Extension

Relationship Smarts PLUS Evaluated at University of Georgia Extension

The University of Georgia Extension delivered the Relationship Smarts Plus program to youth across the state through in-school and after-school settings. From August 30, 2017 to September 3, 2018 a total of 3,013 youth participated in one of 84 programs offered across 30 counties. Majority of the participants felt the program was helpful or very helpful and they were more prepared for relationships in the future.

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THE LATEST

CDC Logo

Why Are Young People Having So Little Sex?

To the relief of many parents, educators, and clergy members who care about the health and well-being of young people, teens are launching their sex lives later. From 1991 to 2017, the Centers for Disease Control finds, the percentage of high-school students who’d had intercourse dropped from 54 to 40 percent.

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NCFR

NCFR 2018 Margaret Arcus Awards Winners

Francesca Adler-Baeder, PH.D., CFLE, Auburn University; and Ted Futris, CFLE, University of Georgia, were the 2018 Margaret Arcus Award Winners at the National Council on Family Relations.

Adler-Baeder, Futris

 

(Ed Note: A special note of gratitude for Drs. Adler-Bader and Futris who both use Dibble programs in their youth work.)

 

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NEWS YOU CAN USE
San Diego State University

Reduced Screen Time for Young Highly Recommended for Well-Being

Too much time spent on gaming, smartphones and watching television is linked to heightened levels and diagnoses of anxiety or depression in children as young as age 2, according to a new study.

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Coalition of Juvinal Justice

Emerging Leadership Presents: Adolescent Brain Development

Nicholas Turco, one of the emerging young leaders, shares his experience and knowledge about the brain development of a young person within and without the juvenile justice system. How does trauma effect their decision making? And how we can utilize their developing brains for keeping themselves out of the juvenile justice system and lead others to do the same.

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TOOLS YOU CAN USE
Love Rules

Love Rules: How to Find a Real Relationship in the Digital World

New book by Joanna Coles brings to light how social media and online dating sites have become the supermarkets of our relationship lives. You have to wade through rows of cupcakes and potato chips to find the produce aisle, where those relationships grounded in intimacy and trust live—the ones worth your investment. A diet book for romantic relationships, Love Rules first asks women to re-assess the way they think about their relationships, and then helps them use that newfound awareness to navigate their love lives more successfully in this very modern, fast-paced—and often lonely—digital age.

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HHS.Gov

Five Tips for Teaching Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education in Schools

Healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) practitioners need more research and information on HMRE programs for youth. From 2011 to 2015, about half the participants served by HMRE grants from the Office of Family Assistance were under age 18. However, most research on HMRE programming focuses on adult couples in existing, committed relationships. Learn more about how healthy relationships were taught to 9th graders in Georgia.

(Ed. Note: More Than Conquerors, Inc., is using Relationship Smarts PLUS with their 9th graders in this report.)

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FUNDING STREAMS

We curate this list of grants with the goal of increasing the numbers of youth who benefit from participating in a Dibble program. Please contact us about ways we can work with you to strengthen your application.

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HHS.Gov

HHS Grant: Promotion of Healthy Adolescence and the Reduction of Teenage Pregnancy and Associated Risk Behaviors

The Funding Opportunity Announcement will provide funding to replicate programs that have been proven through rigorous evaluation to reduce teenage pregnancy, behavioral risk factors underlying teenage pregnancy, or other associated risk factors. The overall goal is to promote healthy adolescence and to address youth sexual risk holistically to result in healthy decision-making and future thriving by enhancing protective factors and preventing teen pregnancy. Estimated application deadline is Mar 29, 2019 

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HHS.Gov

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Centers for Mental Health Services and Substance Use Prevention is offering grants of up to $250,000 to support the Tribal Behavioral Health grant program. The purpose of this program is to prevent and reduce suicidal behavior and substance use, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote mental health among American Indian/Alaska Native youth through the age of 24 years. Learn more and apply by January 4, 2019.

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John Ben Snow Foundation Memorial

John Ben Snow Memorial Trust Education Grants

The John Ben Snow Memorial Trust funds projects from non-profit organizations across several areas related to education and underserved youth, including arts and culture, community initiatives, youth initiatives, educational opportunities, and services for individuals with disabilities. Examples include youth literacy programs, counseling and mentorship services, after-school programs, neighborhood revitalization projects, and more. Grants typically range from $10,000 to $25,000. Deadline: January 1, 2019.

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Kush Desai

Funds for Social Programs in Colorado

The Kush Desai Foundation is dedicated to making a positive difference in the state of Colorado. The Foundation’s current areas of interest include social programs that provide services for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, children and families in need, individuals and families struggling with mental health, individuals nearing the end of their lives, and individuals and families experiencing homelessness. The application deadline is December 15, 2018.

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Girls Rights Project

Grants Empower Girls in the San Francisco Bay Area and Internationally

The Girls Rights Project is dedicated to ensuring that girls throughout the world have a right to life, health, freedom, and education and to ending trafficking, violence, and other forms of mistreatment and discrimination against girls. Areas of interest include education and empowerment, anti-trafficking, legal reform, human rights, health, and gender equality. Grants generally range from $1,000 to $10,000, and priority is given to organizations for whom small grants can make an impact. Applications are accepted throughout the year. Visit the Girls Rights Project website to request a grant by completing the contact form.

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