Healthy Relationship News – November 2019

DIBBLE NEWS

THE LATEST

NEWS YOU CAN USE

TOOLS YOU CAN USE

SECOND WEDNESDAY WEBINAR – November 13, 2019

Foundations:

How to Build & Sustain

the Communication Pipeline with Young Adults

FUNDING STREAMS

News Letter Section Break

DIBBLE NEWS
Dibble Heart

Dr. Rachel Savasuk-Luxton to Head Training and Research Efforts

Rachel Savasuk-Luxton has been named Director of Research and Training at The Dibble Institute effective November 1, 2019. Rachel, who received her Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Studies from Auburn University, wrote her dissertation on factors associated with adolescent dating violence and assessing the impact of youth relationship education on common correlates of adolescent dating violence.

She oversaw the implementation of Relationship Smarts PLUS in Lee County, Alabama schools as part of the Auburn healthy marriage grant. As Director of Research and training, she will oversee Dibble’s training efforts to continue to ensure high-quality training experiences that meet the needs of current and future clients.

sub-section

Dibble Heart

Irene Varley Continues to Serve

Irene Varley, formerly the Director of Education at Dibble, will now work on developing relationships with prospective and new clients as well as helping in the editorial process. We are grateful that Irene, who joined Dibble over 15 years ago, will continue to contribute to the well-being of young people by making relationship education more available to them.

sub-section

Dibble Heart

Jo Anne Eason to Lead National Outreach Initiatives

Jo Anne Eason joins The Dibble Institute to oversee new national outreach initiatives. In this position she will lead the team that acquaints organizations with the benefits of teaching relationship education.

For the last 24 years she has worked at Public Strategies, Inc serving as their SeniorAdvisor with a focus on their Workforce Development, Healthy Marriage, and Responsible Fatherhood grants. Jo Anne was the Project Director on Dibble’s two federal healthy marriage grants that reached over 40,000 students around the country.Through the Oklahoma Healthy Marriage Initiative, she worked with Family and Consumer Sciences teachers to embed Dibble programs in 85% of OK high providing relationship education to over 195,000 students in approximately 300 schools.

sub-section

University of Texas San Antonio

Mind Matters Pilot to Help Youth Overcome Adversity

A University of Texas San Antonio researcher is helping youths cope with life’s challenges and build resiliency skills. Heidi Rueda, an associate professor of social work in the College of Public Policy, is collaborating with Good Samaritan Community Services, a community-based after-school program to conduct exploratory research on building skills to overcome adversity. The program,“Mind Matters: Overcoming Adversity and Building Resilience,” includes life skills like soothing and regulating emotions, managing stress, developing empathy, developing goals and intention, building a support system, and seeking help.

News Letter Section Break

THE LATEST
Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation

nFORM Request for Input

The Fatherhood and Marriage Local Evaluation and Cross-Site Project is seeking public input on potential improvements to nFORM, the Management Information System used by the current cohort of Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood grantees. To advance their learning agenda, Office of Planning Research and Evaluation is seeking public input on potential refinements and improvements to the existing performance measures. Comments may be emailed to nformfeedback@acf.hhs.gov until Friday, December 6, 2019.

sub-section

Young People

A Major Reason Why Millennials and Gen Z Are Reluctant to Marry

In the blossoming age of autonomy, our youngest generations are supplanting traditional predictors of success, like marriage and having children, with career-based ones. A survey of 1,010 US citizens sketches a clear image of what the future holds. Although getting married was an aspiration amongst 35% of Millennials, 40% of the same group were optimistic about grandkids being a part of their future. Retirement, financial security, and financial success were found to be the most coveted goals amongst this demographic.

sub-section

The Boston Globe

Positive Relationships Can Buffer Childhood Trauma & Toxic Stress

A growing body of research suggests sustained, positive relationships with caring adults can help mitigate the harmful effects of childhood trauma. And specialists say pediatricians, social workers, and others who work with kids should take steps to monitor and encourage those healthy relationships — just as they’re careful to screen for abuse and neglect.

News Letter Section Break

NEWS YOU CAN USE
Utah State University

Different Relationship-Belief Patterns in Relationship Education

People come to relationship education classes with different beliefs about forming and developing relationships. This study identified five different groups of relationship beliefs among participants: Blind Love, Slider, Blind Love Slider, Control Tolerates, and Low Risk. Each group has different needs and risk factors associated with their beliefs. Relationship educators should recognize these groups to better focus on the needs of program participants.

sub-section
UC Berkeley

How to Become a Scientist of Your Own Emotions

Our emotions are important clues to how we are experiencing the world, helping us make decisions, build good relationships, fulfill our dreams, and cultivate well-being.

An emotion skills-building program called RULER aims to increase children’s ability to recognize emotions in themselves and others, understand where their emotions come from, label emotions more precisely, express emotions in different contexts, and regulate (or manage) emotions more effectively.

sub-section

Office of Population Affairs

A Day in The Life of a High School Teen

The way adolescents spend their time can strongly influence their health later in life. For youth to maintain a healthy future, they need plenty of sleep; good nutrition; regular exercise; and time to form relationships with family, friends, and caring adults. Additionally, the time adolescents spend in school and in after-school activities with peers and adults can advance healthy academic, emotional, social, and physical development. The amount of time they spend on screens and in social media may also influence adolescents’ overall well-being. The Office of Population Affairs has published new information on how American high school students spend their time, including education, sleep, work and volunteering, exercise, socializing, and religious activities.

News Letter Section Break

TOOLS YOU CAN USE
Search Institute

Get to Know Young People in Your Group Quickly and Deeply

The SEARCH Institute has found that building developmental relationships is critical to young people’s development. And, they have found that at the start of a new school or program year, it can be a time-consuming process. To help simplify the process, they are sharing a free downloadable tool called the 4 S’s Interview to create connections quickly and lay the groundwork for a great year.

sub-section

Healthy Teen Network

Internet Advertising to Recruit Youth

Join Healthy Teen Network’s Director of Innovation and Research, Genevieve Martínez-García, to learn lessons for how to effectively recruit youth into programs and research studies using internet advertising. You’ll gain some great tips to get you started with internet advertising and steered in the right direction. These eight free video resources are filled with useful information for building your program.

sub-section

Administration for Children and Families

Using Rapid Learning Methods to Test & Improve Social Programs

Rapid learning methods aim to expedite program improvement and enhance program effectiveness. Many rapid learning methods leverage iterative cycles of learning, in which evaluators and implementers (and sometimes funders/policymakers) discuss findings, interpret them, and make adaptations to practice and measurement together. Explore this presentation from the 2018 innovative methods meeting and accompanying brief to learn more about rapid learning methods and how to use them.

News Letter Section Break

SECOND WEDNESDAY WEBINAR

November 13

Second Wednesday Webinars

Foundations:

How to Build & Sustain the Communication Pipeline with Young Adults

Recruiting and appealing to young adults ages 18-24 can be challenging for a multitude of reasons. In this webinar, Vanessa Logan describes her unique “boots on the ground” approach for how to build trust with marginalized young adults and consequently is able to provide them with tools to develop self-sufficiency. Integrated into her approach is the essential building of healthy relationship skills with pregnant and parenting youth, empowering them to successfully parent or even co-parent when no longer together.

With a heart for people, Vanessa identifies critical needs of the underserved and builds bridges by partnering with organizations and community initiatives to uncover resources and move others toward economic mobility and self-sufficiency. Vanessa has a voice in the community for what makes a community thrive: its people!

Objectives:

Through the example of Vanessa Logan webinar attendees will learn to:

  1. Recruit young adults 18-24 years old into Healthy Relationship programming;
  2. Build trust with them in order to provide tools to help them build Healthy Relationships; and
  3. Navigate and empower 18-24 year-olds through obstacles that often get them off track towards their life goals.

Presenter: Vanessa Logan, Founder of “N.E.S.S.A in Your Neighborhood”, Navigate, Explore, Serve, Sustain and Advocate.

Who should attend: Social Workers and staff workers in Community Action Agencies, Community Health, University Extension, Non-profit and Church organizations, Alternative High School educators, corrections, homeless youth programs, fatherhood/pregnant/parenting youth programs, any others working with risk-immersed youth.

When: Wednesday, November 13, 2019, 4:00pm Eastern/1:00pm Pacific

Duration: 60 minutes

Cost: Free!

Register Now!

News Letter Section Break

FUNDING STREAMS

Statewide Programs in Oklahoma Funded

Sarkeys

Sarkeys Foundation

The mission of the Sarkeys Foundation is to improve the quality of life in Oklahoma. The Foundation’s major areas of grant support include education, social service and human service needs, and cultural and humanitarian programs of statewide significance. Preference is given to organizations that have been in operation at least three years. The upcoming deadline for letters of inquiry is December 2, 2019. (Interested applicants should speak with a Foundation staff member prior to submitting a letter of inquiry.) Invited proposals will be due February 3, 2020. Visit the Foundation’s website for more information on the application process.

sub-section

Program Addresses Mental Health for Tribal Youth

Department of Health and Human Services

Department of Health and Human Services

The Tribal Behavioral Health Grant Program seeks to prevent suicide and substance misuse, reduce the impact of trauma, and promote mental health among American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth through the age of 24 years. The program is intended to reduce the impact of mental and substance use disorders, foster culturally responsive models that reduce and respond to the impact of trauma in AI/AN communities, and allow AI/AN communities to facilitate collaboration among agencies to support youth as they transition into adulthood. The application deadline is December 10, 2019.

(Ed. Note: If you would like to review Mind Matters as an intervention for this funding,  please email RelationshipSkills @ DibbleInstitute.org.).

sub-section

Support The Dibble Institute when you shop on at Amazon! Use this link while doing your shopping!

News Letter Section Break

The Dibble Institute does not sell or share your contact information.

In most cases we obtained your contact information when you provided it to us when purchasing materials, at a conference, or by attending a Dibble training or webinar. If you no longer wish to receive emails from us simply click the unsubscribe button at the bottom of this email.

News Letter Section Break