Healthy Relationship News – October 2019

THE LATEST

NEWS YOU CAN USE

TOOLS YOU CAN USE

SECOND WEDNESDAY WEBINAR – October 9, 2019

One-on-One:

A New Approach for Teaching Mind Matters in Individual Settings

FUNDING STREAMS

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THE LATEST
University of Georgia

Teens Who Don’t Date Are Less Depressed

Dating, especially during the teenage years, is thought to be an important way for young people to build self-identity, develop social skills, learn about other people, and grow emotionally. Yet new research from the University of Georgia has found that not dating can be an equally beneficial choice for teens. The study, published online in The Journal of School Health, found that adolescents who were not in romantic relationships during middle and high school had good social skills and low depression, and fared better or equal to peers who dated.

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USA Today

Teach Teens Communication Skills, Not Abstinence, in Sex Education

The spotlight of sex education focuses intently on teaching students about the potential risks of sex, and as a result, there is precious little time left to teach sexual communication skills other than “just say no.” However, we can improve teens’ sexual health, while also laying the foundation for happier and healthier relationships and marriages, by flipping the script. Emphasizing sexual communication skills over the risks and dangers of sex is something the Dutch have been doing for decades — and it seems to be working.

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American Enterprise Institute

Are RE Programs for Lower-Income Individuals & Couples Working?

Over the past decade, more than 50 evaluation studies have examined the effectiveness of the Healthy Marriage and Relationships Education (HMRE) programs, including three ACF-funded, large-scale, multisite, random-assignment evaluations. Growing evidence shows that couples can learn to reduce destructive conflict and experience less physical and emotional abuse, and that these programs can improve couples’ positive communication skills, understanding, warmth, support, and co-parenting.

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NEWS YOU CAN USE
University Of Swansea UK

What Young People Say They Want Most In A Partner

What do humans really want in a long-term partner? If people were given a limited menu of characteristics from which to choose, what would be the non-negotiables? And how much of what we value in a partner is influenced by culture and how much is innate? In a nifty new report out of the University of Swansea in the U.K., researchers got 2,700 college students from five countries to progressively narrow down which characteristics were most important to them in a lifetime mate, and the one that emerged from all cultures was kindness.

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Frame Works Institute

FrameWorks Offers New Perspectives On Adolescent Development

In recent decades, scientists have made major breakthroughs in how we understand adolescent development. These findings hold implications for society, yet uptake has been slow. To help build public understanding and create demand for necessary policies and programs, FrameWorks studied how Americans understand the changes that occur during adolescence, the factors that influence it, and what supports it.

The research builds off a body of existing research on public thinking about children, adolescence, and human development.

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Bowling Green State University

Teen Girls’ Reproductive Attitude and the Timing of Sexual Behaviors

When making decisions about sexual behaviors, teen girls consider not only health outcomes, such as pregnancy or contracting a sexually transmitted infection (STI), but also social outcomes, such as guilt or embarrassment. This study shows that fear of social consequences rather than fear of pregnancy or STIs is a larger predictor of the timing of teen girls’ sexual activity.

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TOOLS YOU CAN USE
Georgia Center for Opportunity

VIDEO: The Success Sequence

This video is presented by the Georgia Center for Opportunity. The success sequence is a universally understood concept that success is built on life decisions that are made in the correct order. First, children need education. Second, adults need work. Third, parents need healthy marriages before children.

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Brain Architecture Game

The Brain Architecture Game

This tabletop game experience builds understanding of the powerful role of experiences on early brain development– what promotes it, what derails it, and with what consequences for society. If your organization or community is embarking on a conversation about adverse childhood experiences, toxic stress, or other early childhood issues, the game can be a valuable resource for creating a common understanding and a common language on these topics.

(Ed. Note: This game could be a great supplemental activity with Dibble curricula)

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SECOND WEDNESDAY WEBINAR

October 9

Second Wednesday Webinars

One-on-One:

A New Approach for Teaching Mind Matters in Individual Settings

Young people who have experienced trauma and toxic stress, such as child abuse and neglect, often have difficulty regulating their emotional responses when facing challenges in school, life, and relationships. Thus, Dr. Carolyn Curtis developed Mind Matters: Overcoming Adversity and Building Resilience, a research-based curriculum effective in helping youth overcome adverse and traumatic childhood experiences.

In this webinar, Dr. Carolyn Curtis, will discuss her new addendum to the Mind Matters curriculum. In this guidance, the content of Mind Matters is divided into 15- to 20-minute segments that can now be taught in one-on-one settings. With these adjustments, the Mind Matters curriculum can now be used for home visitors, mentors, and case workers, as well as anyone who works with young people in a one-on-one setting.

Join us in this informative and interactive webinar as we learn about the new, additional approach at implementing the Mind Matters program!

Presenter: Carolyn Rich Curtis, Ph.D., Developer of Mind Matters, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Founder of the Relationship Skills Center in Sacramento, CA.

Who should attend: Anyone who is working with youth who have been traumatized and is wanting to utilize a trauma-informed approach.  Home visitors, mentors, case workers and anyone who works with young people in a one-on-one setting; relationship, marriage, and fatherhood grantees; runaway and homeless youth workers; pregnancy prevention staff; Extension agents; Community Action Agency staff; social workers; foster families; Head Start managers; caseworkers; juvenile justice staff; and all who work with risk-immersed youth.

When: Wednesday, October 9, 2019, 4:00pm Eastern/1:00pm Pacific

Duration: 60 minutes

Cost: Free!

Register Now!

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FUNDING STREAMS
Administration for Children and Families

Secondary Analyses of Strengthening Families Datasets OPRE/ACF

The Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) plans to award up to ten cooperative agreements to fund research to conduct secondary data analysis of archived data, specifically the Building Strong Families (BSF), Supporting Healthy Marriage (SHM), and Parents and Children Together (PACT) datasets. These datasets are from large-scale federal evaluation impact studies, which addressed questions related to healthy marriage and/or responsible fatherhood.

Successful applicants will demonstrate a familiarity with the proposed data for their analysis and an adequate understanding of the variables, sampling, methodology, etc. used to construct the dataset necessary for completion of the work proposed in the application. Proposed research should address topics relevant to strengthening families to improve the lives of children and parents, as well as promote economic stability. Topics of interest include, but may not be limited to the following: mediators of healthy marriage, relationship education, and/or fatherhood programs; measurement issues related to healthy marriage, relationship education, and/or fatherhood programs with low-income families; or father involvement in low-income families. Application Due Oct 11, 2019.

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RCT Funds to Evaluate Social Programs

Arnold Ventures

Arnold Ventures’ Evidence-Based Policy

is a major source of funding for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of social programs, and we are always seeking new proposals for high-quality RCTs. We encourage readers to check out our RCT Opportunity Request for Proposals (RFP), and to consider participating. The process is streamlined and there is no submission deadline. They seek proposals for RCTs across the full spectrum of U.S. social policy, including areas such as early childhood, K-12 and postsecondary education, employment and training, foster care, and crime and substance abuse prevention.

A key goal of their RCT funding is to build the body of social programs backed by strong, replicated evidence of sizable effects on important life outcomes. Their criteria therefore prioritizes funding for RCTs of programs whose prior evidence suggests potential for such sizable, important effects, although we will also fund RCTs based on other compelling reasons (e.g., the program to be evaluated is widely implemented with significant taxpayer investment, and its effectiveness is currently unknown).

The RCT Opportunity RFP, along with related funding announcements and resources, can be found on the Evidence-Based Policy page of Arnold Ventures’ website. We hope this information is useful, and would encourage you to share this email with others who may be interested.

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